In the Mailbag: Your Thoughts on Getting ‘Chipped’

To get chipped … or not to get chipped? That’s the big question. And it’s sparked a big debate here at Banyan Hill Publishing.

To get chipped … or not to get chipped? That’s the big question.

If you haven’t heard, Three Square Market, a Wisconsin company that makes self-service cafeteria kiosks, started implanting tiny microchips in its employees.

I know, it sounds like science fiction. But it’s true — the company even had an odd ceremony where they invited a tattoo artist to insert the rice-sized radio-frequency ID microchips in its workforce on August 1.

And it’s sparked a big debate here at Banyan Hill Publishing. Among our editors — and among you, our readers.

See, some of us — such as our tech expert Paul Mampilly — believe that getting a microchip implanted could make life incredibly convenient. As Paul wrote: “In the end, convenience, cost and a better life always win out.”

And there’s something to that. After all, 50 of the 80 employees at Three Square Market jumped at the chance get the $300 microchip inserted in the webbing between their thumbs and forefingers.

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Now they can leave their ID cards, their wallets and even their passwords at home. The microchip will take care of it all — with just the wave of a hand.

Sounds useful, right?

The employees certainly think so. In fact, most of those interviewed have brushed off privacy concerns, saying it’s exciting and “cool” to be at the forefront of new technological breakthroughs.

But that brings me to the other side of the debate: Should privacy be more of a concern here?

Is this one more step toward a surveillance state? How much can hackers, or your company — or even the government — access if they decide they want to dig into your data?

That’s the big issue at the forefront of privacy expert Ted Bauman’s mind. As Ted wrote: “We live in a society where an increasingly unaccountable corporate-government elite gets away with pretty much whatever it can … That’s why I’m not getting a microchip.”

I know this debate is at the forefront of a lot of your minds too.

We’ve gotten dozens of messages over the past month about the merits of convenience versus privacy. (A big thanks to all who continue to write in, by the way. I always find your thoughts insightful.)

Here are a handful of notes you’ve sent us addressing the pros and cons of getting “chipped.” It’s worth noting that most of you are worried about your privacy

Readers Worried About Privacy:

Tom W. writes: “Loss of privacy eventually equals loss of freedom”

Adrian M. writes: “Have you heard chipped credit cards in your wallet or purse can be read by a passerby with a reading device? Now you are willing to give these thieves access to all of your information for convenience? I own a special wallet to block these thieves from gaining access to my credit/bank card account information. How do you plan to block them from reading the chip in your body?”

Rich L. writes: “I’d equate implanting an ID chip of the type used to track pets as being as foolhardy as keeping your financial data on a computer without a password. Fortunately, in the future, this will not be the case. Any manufacturer worth his salt will realize that such a chip is much too Orwellian to attract many takers.”

Neutral Readers:

Chuck H. writes: “I couldn’t care less as long as they don’t make it mandatory.”

Joe F. writes: “I agree that it is scary. But the point where we should have been scared should have been back in the ‘30s when they issued us all Social Security cards — and our privacy has gone downhill ever since. Anyone who thinks that they live in a ‘free country’ hasn’t been paying attention. I do not endorse getting chipped either, but Paul is right: In the end we will have it, and there is no denying that it will be convenient.”

Readers Excited About the Convenience:

Ben C. writes: “The best use I could see for this technology is medical records for high-risk patients. Imagine having an emergency, going into the emergency room, and the doctor instantly knowing what conditions you have and medications you’re on, even if you can’t answer questions. That could be a lifesaver, literally.”

Henry M. writes: “I would like a single chip to include my driver’s license, medical history, medications, debit and credit card accounts, insurance cards, gun permit, passport, and voter registration — as well as locally programmable features (key card access to secure facilities, etc.). It should also have a feature that allows the user to download totals of all expenses from all sources, provide reminders to take medicines, a calendar feature, and a digital signature. We have put a man on the moon and placed a space probe on a comet. We can figure the security for this and stay ahead of the hackers. Great idea.”

So what do you think? Do you see the benefits in employees — or anyone, really — getting chipped? Or is the convenience overshadowed by the many possible risks?

Which side of the debate do you fall on?

Please keep your thoughts coming! You can always reach us at SovereignInvestor@banyanhill.com or by dropping a comment on the website.

Catch you next week.

Regards,

Jessica Cohn-Kleinberg
Managing Editor, Banyan Hill Publishing

  • Donald Murphy

    Every system in existence is subject to corruption. An implantation would make it personal. No Chip!

  • SAMMY

    I have a lot of misgivings. Like most great ideas, it starts out with good intentions but there is always someone out there who will see it as an opportunity to turn it to their advantage. You’re talking about the potential exposure of ALL of an individual’s personal financial, medical, and family information. The one feature I find palatable is the use of a chip containing a person’s medical information. Even that thought makes me uneasy, but my husband has serious health issues and I know a chip, which can quickly be read by emergency medical providers, could save his life.

  • Dorseyclan

    My family and I will not take a chip ever, willingly. If there is the slightest possibility, that a chip in the hand or else where could be the mark of the beast and there is, we absolutely will resist whole heartedly. I know, you say look at his picture, he must be a wacko! I use it at times because I like the days of the fifties when we had westerns on TV and things were black and white, I do not look like this 99.99 percent of the time!

  • Hogweed

    I think anyone who endorses this is a total idiot. If you think how easy it is now for people to steal your information, when you are chipped, it will be twice as easy to do. Also, the rich and powerful will do whatever they please with your information whenever they like. They are unaccountable and will always and only serve their self interests at your expense. You do anything they dont like, and they will just shut you off. This is just another form of control for all you sheeple out there who already dont care that you are nothing more then a wage slave, and will soon be a slave with almost no rights at all. Wake up before its too late and start organizing.

  • Cheryl

    I absolutely agree with you I will die for Jesus Christ he died for me

  • Rok Tur!

    Well havent any of you read revelation . it says you will not be able to buy or sell anything unless you take the mark of the beast on your right hand or for head nd it tells christians to not take it

  • Rok Tur!

    I mean what if someone want to just turn off your money and what if we dont have cash you want the goverment in your life to see every bit of wealth what about taxes ?? DUH!

  • Etti de Laczay

    Beyond the issues of privacy vs. convenience there is the larger picture that joining all our data into any universally accessible data bank is nothing short of turning the population into a “borg” (from Star Trek) that is: the cyborgization of humanity will in the end force us to think alike, conform to the lowest common denominator, have coordinated ambitions and wants – so those who will control the system (and have no doubt there will be those who’ll figure it out) can sell us whatever they want and make us think we need it – like the chip itself! Yes it is demonic – and I use that in a secular, not a religious sense – it is the end of individuality that we have painstakingly arrived at through our long history. Sure there may be some built-in security measures – but rest assured they will be overcome. The chip is more collectivization-conformity inducing than any “ideology” devised by any authoritarian Soviet-style regime – the more so as it will be “sold” as desirable
    and beneficial. And there will be attempts to force it on us – just as there is now a concerted effort by banks and other institutions to put everything on line and “go paperless” (it’s “good for the environment” – what hypocrites! – while it takes away control of your data) and just look at how social media already distracts the young from living in the real world – and they all want the same things – Don’t become a cyborg! Resist!

  • louisewhiteford

    It will make it possible for the government to turn off you money easily. The money in all the chips will be easy pickings..