Experience a Better Life in Uruguay

Uruguay is ranked better for retirement than the U.S.

Have you ever considered how pregnant with meaning a sigh can be?

At the right moment, that slow exhalation of breath can emphasize and express weariness, pleasure or sadness. In our family there is a traditional “Bauman sigh” that usually elicits the question: “What’s the matter?”

Colonia del Sacramento is an enticing city in southwestern Uruguay, facing across the broad waters of the Río de la Plata, looking towards Buenos Aires, Argentina. Colonia is one of the oldest towns in Uruguay and its 27,000 souls cherish a magical little street there, the Calle de los Suspiros, the Street of Sighs, that breathes secrets and legends that might explain its ancient and unusual name. (Find out for yourself!)

As the late, great Louis Armstrong reminded us in song: “You must remember this/A kiss is still a kiss, a sigh is just a sigh/The fundamental things apply/As time goes by.”

If there is a country anywhere in the world that prizes “the fundamental things,” in my opinion, it is the Oriental Republic of Uruguay. And when you discover it, as I and many others have, you too will sigh with delight — and with a resigned sadness when you must depart.

And I have a reason to sigh as well.

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Tomorrow begins The Sovereign Society Offshore Investment Summit in beautiful Punta del Este, Uruguay, on the shores of the South Atlantic Ocean.

March 10 through 14 the participants will hear from local Uruguay real estate, farming and investment experts, international attorneys, private bankers, independent investment managers and CEOs. The impresario of the meeting will be our man in Montevideo, Juan Federico Fischer, Uruguay’s leading immigration and residency attorney.

Although I have visited Uruguay before, this time I am sighing because I won’t be there. I will be ably represented by my son, Ted Baumann, The Sovereign Society’s Offshore and Asset Protection Editor.

Change and Continuity

On March 1 Uruguay inaugurated a new president, Tabare Vazquez, previously president from 2005 to 2010. His inauguration continues the ruling left-center coalition in parliament that supports capitalism, free-market and free-trade policies — and welcomes foreigners who want to make a home in Uruguay with its liberal, open-minded social policies and low or no taxes.

In his first term as president, Vazquez was popular for his mix of strong social welfare programs with pro-business economic policies. He replaced the widely respected former president Jose “Pepe” Mujica Cordano. In Uruguay, presidents constitutionally are barred from a second consecutive term, perhaps an idea the United States should consider.

Open and Clean

Based on my own conservative-libertarian political philosophy and on four extensive visits to Uruguay in the last three years, I judge Uruguay’s government to be far more moderate and far less socialist than the Obama U.S. administration — and far more open and clean. After all, there’s a reason Uruguay was recently named one of the best countries to retire, while America ranked lower.

I could tell you a lot about this beautiful country and its friendly people, but the latest issue of Juan Fischer’s newsletter presents the advantages of living in Uruguay. You should read it.

It contains links to stories that explain how a country of 3.3 million people and four times as many cows can feed 50 million people worldwide; quotes an elderly man who will convince you that Uruguay is the best place country in the world to live; explains why this is the perfect beach place for retirement in peace and quiet; and a world travel editor explains why he finds Uruguay the best country to “sit down, relax and take it easy.”

Whether you want to find a country to retire, protect your assets from government confiscation or escape from America’s persistent invasion of your privacy, going offshore holds a promise of a better life.

But going offshore requires seeing things firsthand, forming an independent opinion and finding new investment, wealth-protection and residence opportunities. Uruguay offers the best of all three.

Yours for liberty,
Bob Bauman Sovereign Investor
Bob Bauman JD
Chairman, Freedom Alliance